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Safety Harbor
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 348

Safety Harbor

Joe is Safety Harbor's most beloved citizen. Through his gift of simple hospitality for all, and the quiet sharing of his wisdom with those who frequent his diner, he has influenced the lives of many for good. Now, Joe is missing, leaving behind only a cryptic note that simply says, "Carry on." What does it mean to "carry on" as Joe intended? Did he leave of his own accord or is his absence a sign of something more sinister? Through the struggle with these questions, and the ensuing search for Joe, Safety Harbor discovers that it is in the middle of a cosmic struggle between light and darkness that takes some of them to the very edge of time and eternity. They find that heaven is not far from earth, and that our ordinary, flawed lives are indeed both miraculous and extraordinary.

Tragedy and Comedy from Dante to Pseudo-Dante
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 144

Tragedy and Comedy from Dante to Pseudo-Dante

In this study, Professor Kelly analyzes Dante's understanding of the meanings of tragedy and comedy in his undisputed works, especially the 'De vulgari eloquentia' and the 'Comedia'. He finds that Dante's criteria concerned subject-matter and style, not emotions like happiness and sorrow, or plot movement from one mood to another, or humor or the lack of it. He considered Vergil's 'Aeneid' and his own lyric poems to be tragedies because of their sublime subjects and their use of elevated style and vocabulary. He considered the 'Inferno', along with the 'Purgatorio' and the 'Paradiso', to be a comedy because of the range of subjects and styles. Dante's commentators, in contrast, tended to hav...

Systematic Theology (Dogmatik)
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 152

Systematic Theology (Dogmatik)

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Ordinary Saints
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 206

Ordinary Saints

How does God manifest himself in the world? Through the righteous lives of his holy people (the saints). As a religion of witnesses, Christianity is dependent upon its saints (defined as activated disciples) to "testify" to the grace of Christ and the kingdom of God. Their lives are walking billboards of the value of Jesus' teaching and authenticity of Christianity as an ancient spiritual pathway. This is a book about saints who are alive now, and whose everyday acts of kindness and goodness announce that God is at work in the world. Like Jesus, their Master, they are the message, the messenger, and the working model of the kingdom of God, in a lesser key. In following Jesus, ordinary saints are willing to give away their lives in order to convey the substance of their faith to a watching world. If ever there was a time when saints need to live courageously for Christ in the world, it is now. But it will take conviction, credibility, and a great deal of audacity. Ordinary Saints explores what it means to be a saint in the twenty-first century, by exploring the depth-dimensions of saints' lives, bodies, emotions, values, and relationships.

God the Spirit
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 376

God the Spirit

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Phases
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 96

Phases

The poems in Phases are as interested in the creeping penumbral edge of language as they are in the shadowy fact of faith. Playful experiments with form swing to the conceptual ring's apogee, while a colloquy across history and place center the proverbial orbit.

Living in Christian Community
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 382

Living in Christian Community

This book is a description of what the church ought to be. Gish purposes to deal with the concrete issues of what it really means to be a Christian community, the body of Christ.

Women in the New Testament
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 184

Women in the New Testament

Bonnie Thurston examines the personalities, place, and power of women in the New Testament. She provides a cultural and religious context for them by briefly outlining the position of women in the Greco-Roman world. The aim is to reveal the ways in which early Christianity attempted to liberate people from oppression (particularly patriarchy), as well as to point out the places and ways in which the early Christian community compromised with the dominant society.

Philippi at the Time of Paul and after His Death
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 128

Philippi at the Time of Paul and after His Death

Representing a cooperative effort between archaeologists and New Testament Scholars, this volume presents a full account of all archaeological finds related to Philippi as it existed in the early Roman imperial period. In addition, it contains a discussion of the consequences of the discovery in Philippi of the early fourth-century "Basilika of Paul" and the subsequent construction of an octagon around an older tomb of a hero, suggesting that a cult of the martyr Paul flourished in Philippi during the fourth, fifth, and sixth centuries. The volume also includes the first-ever publication of a recently discovered inscription mentioning a Jewish synagogue, photographs, and illustrations. Contents: "Introduction" by Helmut Koester "Colonia Iulia Philippensis" by Chaido Koukouli-Chrysantaki "Paul and Philippi: The Archaeological Evidence" by Charalambos Bakirtzis "Paul and Philippi: The Evidence from Early Christian Literature" by Helmut Koester "Dead Paul: The Apostle as Martyr in Philippi" by Allen Dwight Callahan

My People is the Enemy
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 166

My People is the Enemy

It was to Harlem that I came from the Harvard Law School. I came to Harlem to live, to work there as a lawyer, to take some part in the politics of the neighborhood, to be a layman in the Church there. It is now seven years later. In what I now relate about Harlem, I do not wish to indulge in horror stories, though that would be easy enough to do.Ó In this extraordinary and passionate book, William Stringfellow relates his deep concern with the ugly reality of being black and being poor. As a white Anglo-Saxon, Mr. Stringfellow does not try to speak for African Americans and Puerto Ricans in the Harlem ghetto, but, as a lawyer, he graphically underlines the failure of the American legal system to provide equal justice for the poor. And, as a Christian who lived for seven years on what the New York Times called the worst block in New York City, he challenges the reluctance of the churches to be involved in the racial crisis beyond the point of pontification.Ó