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The Byzantine Grammarians
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 287

The Byzantine Grammarians

TRENDS IN LINGUISTICS is a series of books that open new perspectives in our understanding of language. The series publishes state-of-the-art work on core areas of linguistics across theoretical frameworks as well as studies that provide new insights by building bridges to neighbouring fields such as neuroscience and cognitive science. TRENDS IN LINGUISTICS considers itself a forum for cutting-edge research based on solid empirical data on language in its various manifestations, including sign languages. It regards linguistic variation in its synchronic and diachronic dimensions as well as in its social contexts as important sources of insight for a better understanding of the design of linguistic systems and the ecology and evolution of language. TRENDS IN LINGUISTICS publishes monographs and outstanding dissertations as well as edited volumes, which provide the opportunity to address controversial topics from different empirical and theoretical viewpoints. High quality standards are ensured through anonymous reviewing.

The Philosophy of the Grammarians
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 609

The Philosophy of the Grammarians

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Against the Grammarians (Adversus Mathematicos I)
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 436

Against the Grammarians (Adversus Mathematicos I)

Sextus Empiricus is one of the most important ancient philosophical writers after Plato and Aristotle. His writings are our main source for the doctrines and methods of Scepticism. He probably lived in the second century AD. Eleven books of his writings have survived, covering logic, physics, ethics, and many other fields. Against the Grammarians is the first book of Sextus' Adversus Mathematicos, his broad-ranging polemic against the various liberal studies of classical learning. It is prefaced by a short general attack on the arts (included in this volume); then Sextus focuses on the grammatical writers of the classical era, categorizing, analysing, and criticizing their doctrines. The result is not only an invaluable source for ancient ideas about grammar, language, and literary technique, but an excellent example of sustained Sceptical reasoning. David Blank presents a new translation into clear modern English of this important treatise, together with the first ever commentary on the work. In an extended introduction he discusses Against the Grammarians in the broad context of Sextus' work as a whole, Scepticism in general, and the history of ancient writings in this field.

Grammar and Grammarians in the Early Middle Ages
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 305

Grammar and Grammarians in the Early Middle Ages

One of the most pressing linguistic problems of the early Middle Ages was to determine how Latin, first introduced into the British Isles and other parts of Northern Europe as the language of the Christian church and Roman civilization, could be taught as a foreign language. Vivien Law documents the conceptual shift needed to convert the standard grammatical works of the late Roman empire, naturally orientated towards the needs of native speakers, into descriptive pedagogical grammars. Having examined the nature of the cultural transfer involved in this process, the author turns to the Carolingian rediscovery of Aristotle's works on logic and the consequential reorientation of linguistic scholarship towards the relationship between language and thought. Subsequent chapters deal with other major issues and topics of the period, including the question of language and authority, Aelfric's bilingual grammar, the first grammar of Latin to use the vernacular (Old English), the visual representation of word structure in manuscripts, and medieval grammatical terminology.

Grammars, Grammarians and Grammar-Writing in Eighteenth-Century England
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 369

Grammars, Grammarians and Grammar-Writing in Eighteenth-Century England

The book offers insight into the publication history of eighteenth-century English grammars in unprecedented detail. It is based on a close analysis of various types of relevant information: Alston's bibliography of 1965, showing that this source needs to be revised urgently; the recently published online database Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) with respect to sources of information never previously explored or analysed (such as book catalogues and library catalogues); Carol Percy's database on the reception of eighteenth-century grammars in contemporary periodical reviews; and so-called precept corpora containing data on the treatment in a large variety of grammars (and other ...

Evaluation of Ibn Maḍāʼ's criticism of the Arab grammarians
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 293
Prakrit Grammarians
  • Language: en

Prakrit Grammarians

Planets are subjected to different influences in a horoscope and they are analysed scientifically giving suitable weightages for every condition to arrive at the benefic and malefic percentage of each planet. Similarly bhavas are analysed. Based on these benefic & malefic percentage analysis of planets & bhavas, broad life and yearly predictions can be given. The whole scheme is computerised.

The New Grammarians' Funeral
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 189

The New Grammarians' Funeral

This is probably the sharpest consideration of Chomskyan linguistics yet to appear. Ian Robinson argues that it is important to recognise Chomsky's positive achievement as a definition of the domain of traditional syntax in the context of an adherence to traditional grammar. But this strictly limited achievement offers no basis for many of the claims made for linguistics. Chomsky's views of language as a whole are narrow and conceptually confused; his psychology is based on the predication of unnecessary entities; and the central ambition to make linguistics a natural science is deeply misconceived. The common reader will find the argument clear and invigorating. The study of language necessarily interests philosophers as well as linguists: so the ordinary person with no more than an interest in poetry or speech may feel himself disadvantaged as an amateur. On the contrary: it is by the common reader that the discussion of language is finally judged, and Mr Robinson speaks for the central common sense of speakers and readers of language and literature.

Grammar for Grammarians
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 321

Grammar for Grammarians

Development & theories of English Grammar.