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The Material of Poetry
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 143

The Material of Poetry

Poetry is philosophically interesting, writes Gerald L. Bruns, "when it is innovative not just in its practices, but, before everything else, in its poetics (that is, in its concepts or theories of itself)." In The Material of Poetry, Bruns considers the possibility that anything, under certain conditions, may be made to count as a poem. By spelling out such enabling conditions he gives us an engaging overview of some of the kinds of contemporary poetry that challenge our notions of what language is: sound poetry, visual or concrete poetry, and "found" poetry. Poetry's sense and meaning can hide in the spaces in which it is written and read, says Bruns, and so he urges us to become anthropol...

Maurice Blanchot
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 376

Maurice Blanchot

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2002-11-04
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  • Publisher: JHU Press

He describes what is creative in Blanchot's readings of Heidegger's controversial works and examines Blanchot's conception of poetry as an inquiry into the limits of philosophy, rationality, and power.

Hermeneutics Ancient and Modern
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 318

Hermeneutics Ancient and Modern

In this wide-ranging meditation on the nature and purpose of hermeneutics, Gerald L. Bruns argues that hermeneutics is not merely a contemporary theory but an extended family of questions about understanding and interpretation that predate the beginning of writing. Bruns situates the basic questions of hermeneutics against a background of different cultural traditions and philosophical topics, discussing for example, the interpretation of oracles, the quarrel between philosophy and poetry, Rabbinical midrash, and the nature of Romantic hermeneutics.

Interruptions
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 211

Interruptions

A history of fragmentary—or interrupted—writing in avant-garde poetry and prose by a renowned literary critic. In Interruptions: The Fragmentary Aesthetic in Modern Literature, Gerald L. Bruns explores the effects of parataxis, or fragmentary writing as a device in modern literature. Bruns focuses on texts that refuse to follow the traditional logic of sequential narrative. He explores numerous examples of self-interrupting composition, starting with Friedrich Schlegel's inaugural theory and practice of the fragment as an assertion of the autonomy of words, and their freedom from rule-governed hierarchies. Bruns opens the book with a short history of the fragment as a distinctive feature...

Modern Poetry and the Idea of Language
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 300

Modern Poetry and the Idea of Language

Here Gerald L. Bruns does something remarkable: he makes accessible the theoretical issues involved in the discussion of language as discourse versus that used in art. On one side, we have the language of Orpheus that seeks to unite poetry and man's experience in the world; and on the other -- what Bruns calls the "hermetic tradition" -- we have language used purely for literary and artistic ends, as exemplified in the works of Rabelais, Flaubert (his grand ambition was to write a novel about nothing), Joyce, and Beckett. In the process of examining these two contrasting traditions, Bruns manages to provide an illuminating exposition of Russian Formalist theory. In its clarity and scope, Modern Poetry and the Idea of Language is one of the major works of twentieth-century critical thought.

Tragic Thoughts at the End of Philosophy
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 299

Tragic Thoughts at the End of Philosophy

In this text Bruns investigates the recent phenomenon of philosophers taking an interest in literature and literary theory.

Heidegger's Estrangements
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 233

Heidegger's Estrangements

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1989-01-01
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  • Publisher: Unknown

This book concerns the relationship between language and poetry in Heidegger's later writings. Gerald L. Bruns illuminates these difficult and strange writings by analyzing his style and form and by reflecting on the philosopher's insights.

What Are Poets For?
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 222

What Are Poets For?

Conceptions and practices of poetry change not only from time to time and from place to place but also from poet to poet. This has never been more the case than in recent years. Gerald Bruns’s magisterial What Are Poets For? explores typographical experiments that distribute letters randomly across a printed page, sound tracks made of vocal and buccal noises, and holographic poems that recompose themselves as one travels through their digital space. Bruns surveys one-word poems, found texts, and book-length assemblies of disconnected phrases; he even includes descriptions of poems that no one could possibly write, but which are no less interesting (or no less poetic) for all of that. The p...

On the Anarchy of Poetry and Philosophy
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 274

On the Anarchy of Poetry and Philosophy

Marcel Duchamp once asked whether it is possible to make something that is not a work of art. This question returns over and over in modernist culture, where there are no longer any authoritative criteria for what can be identified (or excluded) as a work of art. As William Carlos Williams says, A poem can be made of anything, even newspaper clippings.At this point, art turns into philosophy, all art is now conceptual art, and the manifesto becomes the distinctive genre of modernism. This book takes seriously this transformation of art into philosophy, focusing upon the systematic interest that so many European philosophers take in modernism. Among the philosophers Gerald Bruns discusses are...