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Body, Mind, and Method
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 314

Body, Mind, and Method

Simple seeing. Plain talking. Language in use and persons in action. These are among the themes of Virgil Aldrich's writings, from the 1930's onward. Throughout these years, he has been an explorer of conceptual geography: not as a foreign visitor studying an alien land, but close up 'in the language in which we live, move, and have our being'. This is his work. It is clear to those who know him best that he also has fun at it. Yet, in the terms of his oft-cited distinction, it is equally clear that he is to be counted not among the funsters of philosophy, but among its most committed workers. Funsters are those who attempt to do epistemology, metaphysics, or analysis by appealing to example...

Theoretical Knowledge
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 412

Theoretical Knowledge

In Theoretical Knowledge an original conception of a structure and dynamics of scientific knowledge is proposed. A detailed analysis of the foundations of science performed by the author allowed him to develop new ideas and approaches, to demonstrate how sociocultural factors are incorporated in the process of yielding of new theories. He shows direct and inverse links between foundations of science and new theories and empirical facts evolved from those, how among many potentially possible histories of science a culture selects just those directions which become a real history of science. The author analyses mechanisms of the generation of scientific theories and shows that those are change...

Transactions of the Liverpool Engineering Society
  • Language: en

Transactions of the Liverpool Engineering Society

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1885
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  • Publisher: Unknown

None

Vision and Mind
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 627

Vision and Mind

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2002
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  • Publisher: MIT Press

A collection of works, many of them classics, on the orthodox view of visual perception.

Perception, Knowledge and Belief
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 284

Perception, Knowledge and Belief

This collection of essays by eminent philosopher Fred Dretske brings together work on the theory of knowledge and philosophy of mind spanning thirty years. The two areas combine to lay the groundwork for a naturalistic philosophy of mind. The essays focus on perception, knowledge, and consciousness. Together, they show the interconnectedness of Dretske's work in epistemology and his more contemporary ideas on philosophy of mind, shedding light on the links which can be made between the two. This collection will be a valuable resource for a wide range of philosophers and their students, and will also be of interest to cognitive scientists, psychologists, and philosophers of biology.

Engaging the Immediate
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 133

Engaging the Immediate

An examination of the close connection between Sren Kierkegaard and the method of indirect, or unverbalized, communication long used by psychotherapists. Clinical examples are used to develop Kierkegaard's description of indirect communication into theoretical grounding for therapeutic devices such as role playing, paradox, and metaphorical stories.

Theory and Experiment
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 296

Theory and Experiment

This is not "another collection of contributions on a traditional subject." Even more than we dared to expect during the preparatory stages, the papers in this volume prove that our thinking about science has taken a new turn and has reached a new stage. The progressive destruction of the received view has been a fascinating and healthy experience. At present, the period of destruction is over. A richer and more equilibrated analysis of a number of problems is possible and is being cru'ried out. In this sense, this book comes right on time. We owe a lot to the scholars of the Kuhnian period. They not only did away with obstacles, but in several respects instigated a shift in attention that changed history and philosophy of science in a irreversible way. A c1earcut example - we borrow it from the paper by Risto Hilpinen - concerns the study of science as a process, Rnd not only as a result. Moreover, they apparently reached several lasting results, e.g., concerning the tremendous impact of theoretical conceptions on empirical data. Apart from baffling people for several decades, this insight rules out an other return to simple-minded empiricism in the future.

Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 236

Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences

Uniqueness of style versus plurality of styles: in terms of these aesthetic categories one of the most important differences between the recent past and the present can be described. This difference manifests itself in all spheres of life - in fashion, in everyday life, in the arts, in science. What is of interest for my purposes in this book are its manifestations in the processes of con cept formation as they occur in the humanities, broadly conceived. Here the following methodological approaches seem to dominate the scene. 1. A tendency to apply semiotic concepts in various fields of research. 2. Attempts to introduce metrical concepts and measurement, even into disciplines tra ditionally...

Relativism Refuted
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 217

Relativism Refuted

None

An Architectonic for Science
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 440

An Architectonic for Science

This book has grown out of eight years of close collaboration among its authors. From the very beginning we decided that its content should come out as the result of a truly common effort. That is, we did not "distribute" parts of the text planned to each one of us. On the contrary, we made a point that each single paragraph be the product of a common reflection. Genuine team-work is not as usual in philosophy as it is in other academic disciplines. We think, however, that this is more due to the idiosyncrasy of philosophers than to the nature of their subject. Close collaboration with positive results is as rewarding as anything can be, but it may also prove to be quite difficult to impleme...